Full course description


About the Course

The course will expose you to the institutions and processes used to punish individuals alleged to have committed crimes that constitute some of the most serious violations of international humanitarian and human rights law. The course considers international criminal law in its broader political context and as one response to war and mass atrocities.

What You Gain

By the end of this minicourse, you should be able to:
  • Use the vocabulary in the field of international criminal law;
  • Describe the various jurisdictional bases for prosecuting international crimes and the international institutions to enforce ICL;
  • Evaluate the different institutions used to enforce international criminal law;
  • Evaluate the position of the United States with respect to the various institutions used to enforce international criminal law;
  • Analyze the efficacy of ICL as a means of deterring and punishing international crimes, as well as promoting international peace, reconciliation, and security;
  • Justify the use of ICL or other transitional justice mechanisms to address armed conflict, mass violence, or repression;
  • Apply the substantive international criminal law to particular facts and conduct; and
  • Develop foundational practice-ready prosecutorial and defense skills.

Meet the Instructor

Professor Dutton’s research interests include international criminal law, international human rights law, and maritime piracy. Broadly speaking, her scholarship examines questions about international cooperation and the role and effectiveness of international institutions in deterring and holding accountable those who commit crimes of international concern. Dutton has published her research in a variety of law reviews. In May 2013, her book entitled Rules, Politics, and the International Criminal Court: Committing to the Court was published by Routledge.

Courses:

Comparative law, international law, international criminal law, evidence, criminal law, criminal procedure

See Sample Course

Length: 1 semester.
Credit: 3
Institution: 
Audience: Open
Program: No
Type: Fully online